Biotherapy, health resource center for alternative medicine.Biotherapy - Center .com is a free resource center for alternative medicine.

 

  Vitamins

  Minerals

  Herbs

  Nutrition

  Disease

  Treatment

  Resources

  Site Map

 

 
 

MOST COMMON DISEASES IN THE UNITED STATES

 

Modern medical science blames almost all "discovered" diseases on a "single cause" such as bad gene, virus, bacteria or fungi. If it is a chronic condition or cancer or MS or eczema, or psoriasis ... than the most common answer given by established medical science is: "we don't know".

Why? Why don't we know?  Because we are hunting for a single cause, while in reality there is a whole "forest" of causative agents and cofactors.  The truth is, no illness or syndrome is caused by a single factor, not even by 3 cofactors. There are many causative agents such as poor immunity, poor health, accumulation of toxins inside the body, poor thoughts that promote disease.

The game called illness is played by three major players: our spirit, our mind, and our body which are actually one ... and the cofactors that influence these players: ancestors, family, lifestyle, diet, environment, and our mind. When one of the players is disharmonious, it usually influences the other two and as the result the disease occurs. 

HYPERTENSION

Blood pressure is the result of two forces, one created by the heart as it pumps blood into the arteries, and the other created by the arterial blood vessels as they exert resistance to the blood flow from the heart.

Hypertension, or elevated blood pressure, indicates that the heart is working harder than normal, putting both the heart and the arteries under a greater strain. This may contribute to heart attacks, strokes, kidney failure and atherosclerosis. If high blood pressure isn't treated, the heart may have to work progressively harder to pump enough blood and oxygen to the body's organs and tissues to meet their needs.

ASTHMA

Asthma is a chronic lung disorder that causes airways (the tubes that carry air into and out of the lungs) to become inflamed, which means that they swell and produce lots of thick mucus. The muscles surrounding the airways also tend to tighten, which makes the already clogged airways even narrower. This results in asthma symptoms, which can include coughing, wheezing, and shortness of breath. In a person with asthma, the airways are overly sensitive to certain things (such as allergies, viral infections, cold air, exercise, and smoke) that can "trigger," or bring on, asthma symptoms. People with asthma often find that their symptoms come and go - when the symptoms are present, it's known as a flare, flare-up, episode, exacerbation, or attack.

DIABETES

Type 1 diabetes, formerly called juvenile diabetes, is usually first diagnosed in children, teenagers, or young adults. In this form of diabetes, the beta cells of the pancreas no longer make insulin because the body's immune system has attacked and destroyed them.

Type 2 diabetes, formerly called adult-onset diabetes, is the most common form. People can develop it at any age, even during childhood. This form of diabetes usually begins with insulin resistance, a condition in which muscle, liver, and fat cells do not use insulin properly. At first, the pancreas keeps up with the added demand by producing more insulin. In time, however, it loses the ability to secrete enough insulin in response to meals.

Gestational diabetes develops in some women during the late stages of pregnancy. Although this form of diabetes usually goes away after the baby is born, a woman who has had it is more likely to develop type 2 diabetes later in life. Gestational diabetes is caused by the hormones of pregnancy or by a shortage of insulin.

CANCER

Cancer begins in cells, the building blocks that make up tissues. Tissues make up the organs of the body.

Normally, cells grow and divide to form new cells as the body needs them. When cells grow old, they die, and new cells take their place.

Sometimes this orderly process goes wrong. New cells form when the body does not need them, and old cells do not die when they should. These extra cells can form a mass of tissue called a growth or tumor.

  1. Tumors can be benign or malignant:

  2. Benign tumors are not cancer:

  3. Benign tumors are rarely life-threatening.

  4. Generally, benign tumors can be removed, and they usually do not grow back.

  5. Cells from benign tumors do not invade tissues around them.

  6. Cells from benign tumors do not spread to other parts of the body.

  7. Malignant tumors are cancer:

  8. Malignant tumors are generally more serious than benign tumors. They may be life- threatening.

  9. Malignant tumors can often be removed, but they may grow back.

  10. Cells from malignant tumors can invade and damage nearby tissues and organs.

Cells from malignant tumors can spread to other parts of the body. The cells spread by breaking away from the original cancer (primary tumor) and entering the bloodstream or lymphatic system. They invade other organs, forming new tumors and damaging these organs. The spread of cancer is called metastasis.

URINARY INCONTINENCE

Women experience incontinence twice as often as men. Pregnancy and childbirth, menopause, and the structure of the female urinary tract account for this difference. But both women and men can become incontinent from neurologic injury, birth defects, strokes, multiple sclerosis, and physical problems associated with aging.

Older women, more often than younger women, experience incontinence. But incontinence is not inevitable with age. Incontinence is treatable and often curable at all ages. If you experience incontinence, you may feel embarrassed. It may help you to remember that loss of bladder control can be treated. You will need to overcome your embarrassment and see a doctor to learn if you need treatment for an underlying medical condition.

Incontinence in women usually occurs because of problems with muscles that help to hold or release urine. The body stores urine--water and wastes removed by the kidneys--in the bladder, a balloon-like organ. The bladder connects to the urethra, the tube through which urine leaves the body.

During urination, muscles in the wall of the bladder contract, forcing urine out of the bladder and into the urethra. At the same time, sphincter muscles surrounding the urethra relax, letting urine pass out of the body. Incontinence will occur if your bladder muscles suddenly contract or muscles surrounding the urethra suddenly relax.

MIGRAINES/HEADACHES

During the past year, nearly 90% of men and 95% of women have had at least one headache.

Most people with headache use nonprescription pain relievers to treat their symptoms.

Store shelves hold a remarkable array of pain relievers, so you need more facts than ever to select one that best meets your needs.

In light of the growing trend towards self-care, you have more responsibility than ever in safeguarding you and your family's health and well-being.

There are two main types of headache: primary and secondary.

  1. Primary headaches include tension-type, migraine, and cluster headaches and are not caused by other underlying medical conditions. More than 90% of headaches are primary.

  2. Secondary headaches result from other medical conditions, such as infection or increased pressure in the skull due to a tumor. These account for fewer than 10% of all headaches.

Reprinted from the web site of the American Council for Headache Education (www.achenet.org)

INSOMNIA/SLEEP DISORDERS

At least 40 million Americans each year suffer from chronic, long-term sleep disorders each year, and an additional 20 million experience occasional sleeping problems. These disorders and the resulting sleep deprivation interfere with work, driving, and social activities. They also account for an estimated $16 billion in medical costs each year, while the indirect costs due to lost productivity and other factors are probably much greater. Doctors have described more than 70 sleep disorders, most of which can be managed effectively once they are correctly diagnosed. The most common sleep disorders include insomnia, sleep apnea, restless legs syndrome, and narcolepsy.

ARTHRITIS

Arthritis literally means joint inflammation, and it can affect joints in any part of the body. Joints are places in the body where two bones meet.

Many people use the term arthritis to refer to rheumatic diseases; however, the different kinds of arthritis comprise just a portion of the rheumatic diseases.

Arthritis is often a chronic disease, which means that it can affect you over a long period of time. Many forms of arthritis cause swelling, redness, heat, and pain. The 3 most common are:

  1. Osteoarthritis

  2. Rheumatoid Arthritis

  3. Gout

OSTEOPOROSIS

Osteoporosis, or porous bone, is a disease characterized by low bone mass and structural deterioration of bone tissue, leading to bone fragility and an increased susceptibility to fractures, especially of the hip, spine, and wrist, although any bone can be affected.

Osteoporosis is a major public health threat for an estimated 44 million Americans, or 55 percent of the people 50 years of age or older. In the U.S. today, 10 million individuals are estimated to already have the disease and almost 34 million more are estimated to have low bone mass, placing them at increased risk for osteoporosis.

Of the 10 million Americans estimated to have osteoporosis, eight million are women and 2 million are men.

One in two women and one in four men over age 50 will have an osteoporosis-related fracture in her/his remaining lifetime.

Significant risk has been reported in people of all ethnic backgrounds.

While osteoporosis is often thought of as an older person's disease, it can strike at any age.

DEPRESSION

A depressive disorder is an illness that involves the body, mood, and thoughts. It affects the way a person eats and sleeps, the way one feels about oneself, and the way one thinks about things. A depressive disorder is not the same as a passing blue mood. It is not a sign of personal weakness or a condition that can be willed or wished away. People with a depressive illness cannot merely "pull themselves together" and get better. Without treatment, symptoms can last for weeks, months, or years. Appropriate treatment, however, can help most people who suffer from depression. 

HIGH CHOLESTEROL

Your blood cholesterol level has a lot to do with your chances of getting heart disease. High blood cholesterol is one of the major risk factors for heart disease. A risk factor is a condition that increases your chance of getting a disease. In fact, the higher your blood cholesterol level, the greater your risk for developing heart disease or having a heart attack. Heart disease is the number one killer of women and men in the United States. Each year, more than a million Americans have heart attacks, and about a half million people die from heart disease

ALLERGY

When the immune system malfunctions, it can unleash a torrent of disorders and diseases. One of the most familiar is allergy. Allergies such as hay fever and hives are related to the antibody known as IgE. The first time an allergy-prone person is exposed to an allergen - for instance, grass pollen - the individual's B cells make large amounts of grass pollen IgE antibody. These IgE molecules attach to granule-containing cells known as mast cells, which are plentiful in the lungs, skin, tongue, and linings of the nose and gastrointestinal tract. The next time that person encounters grass pollen, the IgE-primed mast cell releases powerful chemicals that cause the wheezing, sneezing, and other symptoms of allergy.

CROHN'S DISEASE

Crohn's disease causes inflammation in the small intestine. Crohn's disease usually occurs in the lower part of the small intestine, called the ileum, but it can affect any part of the digestive tract, from the mouth to the anus. The inflammation extends deep into the lining of the affected organ. The inflammation can cause pain and can make the intestines empty frequently, resulting in diarrhea.

Crohn's disease is an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), the general name for diseases that cause inflammation in the intestines. Crohn's disease can be difficult to diagnose because its symptoms are similar to other intestinal disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome and to another type of IBD called ulcerative colitis. Ulcerative colitis causes inflammation and ulcers in the top layer of the lining of the large intestine.

Crohn's disease affects men and women equally and seems to run in some families. About 20 percent of people with Crohn's disease have a blood relative with some form of IBD, most often a brother or sister and sometimes a parent or child.

Crohn's disease may also be called ileitis or enteritis.

ULCERATIVE COLITIS

Ulcerative colitis is an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), the general name for diseases that cause inflammation in the small intestine and colon. Ulcerative colitis can be difficult to diagnose because its symptoms are similar to other intestinal disorders and to another type of IBD called Crohn's disease. Crohn's disease differs from ulcerative colitis because it causes inflammation deeper within the intestinal wall. Also, Crohn's disease usually occurs in the small intestine, although it can also occur in the mouth, esophagus, stomach, duodenum, large intestine, appendix, and anus.

Ulcerative colitis may occur in people of any age, but most often it starts between ages 15 and 30, or less frequently between ages 50 and 70. Children and adolescents sometimes develop the disease. Ulcerative colitis affects men and women equally and appears to run in some families.

AIDS

AIDS - acquired immunodeficiency syndrome - was first reported in the United States in 1981 and has since become a major worldwide epidemic. AIDS is caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). By killing or damaging cells of the body's immune system, HIV progressively destroys the body's ability to fight infections and certain cancers. People diagnosed with AIDS may get life-threatening diseases called opportunistic infections, which are caused by microbes such as viruses or bacteria that usually do not make healthy people sick.

More than 830,000 cases of AIDS have been reported in the United States since 1981. As many as 950,000 Americans may be infected with HIV, one-quarter of whom are unaware of their infection. The epidemic is growing most rapidly among minority populations and is a leading killer of African-American males ages 25 to 44. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), AIDS affects nearly seven times more African Americans and three times more Hispanics than whites.

The term AIDS applies to the most advanced stages of HIV infection. CDC developed official criteria for the definition of AIDS and is responsible for tracking the spread of AIDS in the United States.

 
 

Legal Disclaimer: The statements made in this website have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. The products and procedures presented at this website are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease or illness, to prescribe any medication or to be a substitute for medical treatment.